University Partners

CHESS brings together 18 partner organisations from 8 European countries, including universities, industry and healthcare providers, to redesign researcher education for connected health.

Academic and research leaders are involved from different universities across Europe and will bring their knowledge and expertise to CHESS, through the research, the training, and the dissemination and research outputs.

UCD
University College Dublin
Prof Brian Caulfield

Brian’s early research career was focused on laboratory-based evaluation of human performance in health and sport, with particular emphasis on understanding the neurophysiological contributions to repeated musculoskeletal injuries in sport.  He has shifted his research focus from laboratory-based analysis towards the field, home and community where contextual relevance is significantly enhanced. This move has been enabled through development of cross cutting collaborations with researchers in Computer Science and Biomedical Engineering across the globe, with a view to explore potential for development and validation of wearable and mobile sensing measurement/intervention applications that open up a new vista for human performance evaluation and enhancement across the spectrum from elite sport to chronic disease and ageing. He is Dean of Physiotherapy at UCD, Director of the Insight Centre for Data Analytics, and lead Principal Investigator with Ireland’s Connected Health Technology Centre, ARCH.

Assoc Professor Tara Cusack
Dr Tara Cusack

Tara is Supervisor for an Early Stage Researcher who will focus on delivering behaviour-change inter-professional education (IPE) for clinicians to drive Connected Health.

Transforming primary health care service delivery to meet the needs of whole communities in an integrated, interdisciplinary, and user friendly way is the primary goal of many governmental health care agendas and strategies. More recently, the emphasis for contemporary health care has moved from the delivery of acute care towards the delivery of preventative care.

Encouraging people to change their lifestyles with a view to improving their health outlook is challenging and requires particular skills, competencies and strategies that incorporate a spherical view of patient health and personal profile. Interdisciplinary education (IPE), where healthcare professionals learn from/about each other, can improve collaboration, patient education, and quality of care (CAIPE 2011).

The multidisciplinary nature of health care facilities necessitates that health care professionals work together in an integrated collaborative way. Behaviour change IPE, delivered through a digital interface will create an environment in which behaviour change skills can be learned in an integrated, collaborative, interdisciplinary way.  Preparing clinicians to work as multidisciplinary teams and embrace the challenge of delivering preventative medicine has important implications for population health.  The aim of the programme is to educate clinicians to empower patients to engage in change.

Tara’s research mainly concerns two areas, firstly education and curriculum development for health care professionals and secondly evaluating exercise interventions for individuals with chronic diseases. Tara has examined the value of inter-professional education and problem based learning as facilitators of better educational outcomes for health care professionals.  Tara has researched in the area of curriculum design firstly, in terms of ‘Physical Activity and Exercise’ and its incorporation into the physiotherapy education programmes across Ireland, and currently is involved in examining, from a stakeholder and expert perspective, how best curricula can be designed to prepare physiotherapy graduates for employment in the Primary Health Care sector. Tara is currently a UCD Fellow in Teaching and Academic Development involved in examining Research-Teaching Linkages. Tara’s clinical research is in the area of exercise interventions, and their value in the management of chronic diseases. Tara has been involved in randomised controlled clinical trials (RCTs) in the area of rheumatology, and stroke evaluating exercise based interventions for the relief of the symptoms of both osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. Tara has conducted research in clinical centres, in order that the research is grounded in contemporary clinical practice areas. Mixed methods studies, which encompass both quantitative and qualitative data, are of particular interest to Tara.

Susi Geiger
Prof Susi Geiger

Susi is Supervisor for an Early Stage Researcher who will focus on identifying methods of moving go-to-market decisions up the timeline to facilitate better planning and more targeted investment. Susi’s research interests revolve around hi-tech business-to-business markets, especially topics concerning entrepreneurial sales and marketing in complex regulated markets. Susi is currently doing research at UC Berkeley as part of her Marie Sklodowska Curie Global Fellowship, investigating market practices and market shaping in digital health markets. Since 2013, she has been a Principal Investigator in the Enterprise Ireland funded ARCH Technology Center for Applied Research Connected Health, where she directs a research team researching organisational and market change in Connected Health markets.

Aristotle University of Thessaloniki
Aristotle University of Thessaloniki
Ioanna Chouvarda
Dr Ioanna Chouvarda

Ioanna Chouvarda leads the Work Package, Change and is the Supervisor for an Early Stage Researcher who will focus on integrative patient models of health and lifestyle change as part of a Connected Health solution.

Patient-centred care demands patient responsibility for lifestyle change based on a health-status/personal choice consensus between patient and professional. Barriers to compliance related to conditions such as cognitive issues, misperceptions, adverse events, and overall physiology problems have been identified. Lifestyle factors (sleep, diet, activity) intertwine and affect each other while social motivation may have a positive effect.

Ioanna has vast experience in Biomedical signal processing and physiological modelling, Biomedical Information Management, and eHealth systems and services. Ioanna is particular interested in the interplay between physiological and behavioural factors, patterns of patient involvement/compliance vs effect in chronic disease management, as well as Connected Health technologies to monitor, quantify, and support patients.

Nicos Maglaveras

Grenoble Ecole de Management
Grenoble Ecole de Management

Valerie Sabatier

University of Oulu
Univerity of Oulu
Minna Isomursu

Prof Minna Isomursu

Minna Isomursu leads the Work Package, Dissemination, and is the Supervisor for three Early Stage Researchers whose focus will be on the following:

  • Design for support in patient/citizen health behaviour change and link with a social context.Social influence has been shown to be one of the most powerful factors affecting lifestyle choices and health behaviour.  Digital services aimed at supporting lifestyle/health behaviour change can maximise the power of health data visualisation by showing an individual how their data relates to that of others and are especially powerful when social relationship data is used
  • Understanding personalised healthcare and data ownership “My Data” as an enabler for personalised health services. Calls for human centred healthcare system are common today while the healthcare sector is struggling to be cost-effective in the face of increasing demand.  Personalized healthcare is a paradigm shift from the current problematic state. This research will explore how changes in health data control could make healthcare services more personalized and human centred. ”My Data” is about an individual’s right to control and grant access to their data making data more useful – accessible, understandable and meaningful
  • Invert the traditional concept of “value creation in healthcare” to “value from health rather than treatments”. This research addresses concerns pre-system where emerging patient-centred care models create value from improved health, not disease treatments thus supplementing or expanding current care models

In CHESS, Professor Isomursu examines new kinds of value co-creation models in services targeted for health and wellbeing, visualisation of health data, and ownership of health data. Her research looks at how digital services can create value in the context of health and wellbeing, and how this value can be demonstrated and validated in experimental contexts.

Professor Isomursu research interests are in Digital Services for health and retail. In her recent work, she has studied medication management support for old adults, opportunities of video communication in occupational therapy and social interaction of old adults and their social network, and integrating web shopping into offering of brick-and-mortar stores. Her current research interests include, for example, personalisation of services utilising digital resources, and evaluation of subjective experience of value in health and retail service concepts.

Karin Väyrynen

University of Ulster
Ulster Univeristy
Dewar Finaly
Dr Dewar Finlay

Dr Dewar Finlay is a Senior Lecturer at the University of Ulster’s School of Engineering his main areas of teaching are in Engineering Computing and Digital Signal Processing. His main area of research interest is in Healthcare Technology with a particular focus on computerized electrocardiology. He is a member of the editorial board of the Journal of Electrocardiology and serves on the Board of Directors of Computing in Cardiology, Inc and the Executing Board for the International Society for Computerised Electrocardiology.

Dewar is part of the Ulster team who lead the Data Work Package (WP 3). He will jointly supervise two Early Stage Researchers in the following areas:

  • Development of non-invasive methods for CH data acquisition. Hypertension is the most common cause of heart-disease and coronary artery disease and a major risk factor for stroke. Blood pressure (BP) measurement is performed either invasively by an intra-arterial catheter (continuous and accurate but has increased risk) or noninvasively by cuff sphygmomanometery (safe but less reliable and infrequent). Pulse Transit Time (PTT) and Pulse Wave Velocity (PWV) have been shown to co-relate with arterial BP and have been reported to be suitable for indirect BP measurement. Arterial BP can be estimated from ECG and PPG waveforms. A method for continuous BP monitoring not requiring a cuff and only requires ecg electrodes and a LED/photo detector is the non-invasive protocol involving PTT. To date, r-squared correlations are low, much work is required on improving signal quality, signal processing, and optimum capture of the key signal parameters which will be the focus for this research..
  • Design of advanced algorithms for Connected Health data analysis- Atrial fibrillation (AF) detection in the wearable device setting. AF is the most common cardiac arrhythmia (irregular heart beat). It may cause no symptoms but is often associated with palpitations, fainting, chest pain, or congestive heart failure. AF increases stroke risk up to seven times that of the average population, depending on the presence of additional risk factors (such as high blood pressure). AF patients have significant potential to benefit from developments in CH services.

Daniel Guldenring
Dr Daniel Guldenring

Dr. Daniel Guldenring is a lecturer in Electronic Engineering at Ulster University, Belfast, United Kingdom. He received a Dipl.-Ing. (FH) degree in Electrical Engineering and a MEng degree in Mechatronics Engineering from the Augsburg University of Applied Sciences, Augsburg, Germany in 2009.  Dr. Guldenring received this Ph.D. from the School of Computing and Mathematics of the Ulster University, Belfast, in 2013.  His research focuses on medical devices, with a particular interest in biomedical signal processing for computerised Electrocardiology.

Daniel is part of the Ulster team who lead the Data Work Package (WP 3).  He will jointly supervise two Early Stage Researchers:

Development of non-invasive methods for CH data acquisition. Hypertension is the most common cause of heart-disease and coronary artery disease and a major risk factor for stroke. Blood pressure (BP) measurement is performed either invasively by an intra-arterial catheter (continuous and accurate but has increased risk) or noninvasively by cuff sphygmomanometery (safe but less reliable and infrequent). Pulse Transit Time (PTT) and Pulse Wave Velocity (PWV) have been shown to co-relate with arterial BP and have been reported to be suitable for indirect BP measurement. Arterial BP can be estimated from ECG and PPG waveforms. A method for continuous BP monitoring not requiring a cuff and only requires ecg electrodes and a LED/photo detector is the non-invasive protocol involving PTT. To date, r-squared correlations are low, much work is required on improving signal quality, signal processing, and optimum capture of the key signal parameters which will be the focus for this research.

Design of advanced algorithms for Connected Health data analysis- Atrial fibrillation (AF) detection in the wearable device setting. AF is the most common cardiac arrhythima (irregular heart beat). It may cause no symptoms but is often associated with palpitations, fainting, chest pain, or congestive heart failure. AF increases stroke risk up to seven times that of the average population, depending on the presence of additional risk factors (such as high blood pressure). AF patients have significant potential to benefit from developments in CH services.

Jim McLaughlin
Prof Jim McLaughlin OBE

Prof Jim McLaughlin OBE, a physicist is a Fellow of the Institute of Physics and the Irish Academy of Engineering and a Member of the IEEE. He has developed significant initiatives within bioengineering research, technology transfer, outreach and teaching since 1986. Presently, as a Professor in the School of Engineering he is also the Director of the Engineering Research Institute and Director of NIBEC.  His salient disciplines address Connected Health, healthcare wireless sensor systems, nanotechnology and related bio-sensing applications.

Jim is part of the Ulster team who lead the Data Work Package (WP 3).  He will jointly supervise two Early Stage Researchers:

Development of non-invasive methods for CH data acquisition. Hypertension is the most common cause of heart-disease and coronary artery disease and a major risk factor for stroke. Blood pressure (BP) measurement is performed either invasively by an intra-arterial catheter (continuous and accurate but has increased risk) or noninvasively by cuff sphygmomanometery (safe but less reliable and infrequent). Pulse Transit Time (PTT) and Pulse Wave Velocity (PWV) have been shown to co-relate with arterial BP and have been reported to be suitable for indirect BP measurement.. Arterial BP can be estimated from ECG and PPG waveforms. A method for continuous BP monitoring not requiring a cuff and only requires ecg electrodes and a LED/photo detector is the non-invasive protocol involving PTT. To date, r-squared correlations are low, much work is required on improving signal quality, signal processing, and optimum capture of the key signal parameters which will be the focus for this research.

Design of advanced algorithms for Connected Health data analysis- Atrial fibrillation (AF) detection in the wearable device setting. AF is the most common cardiac arrhythima (irregular heart beat). It may cause no symptoms but is often associated with palpitations, fainting, chest pain, or congestive heart failure. AF increases stroke risk up to seven times that of the average population, depending on the presence of additional risk factors (such as high blood pressure). AF patients have significant potential to benefit from developments in CH services.

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